Constellation CLT

Constellation CLT logo

Constellation CLT  is designed to connect visitors of The Mint Museum with the universe of talent in the local community.

Constellation CLT is an exhibition series designed to connect visitors to The Mint Museum with artists in our community and to activate the public spaces of the museum. The installations rotate three times per year and can be seen in four places at Mint Museum Uptown: in the entrance; at the foot of the atrium escalator; and on the landings of the Mezzanine and 4th levels.

Constellation CLT is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

On View Now

Intergalactic Soul

Intergalactic Soul

Charlotte artists Marcus Kiser and Jason Woodberry are the artistic forces behind Intergalactic Soul, the story of two young Black astronauts, Pluto and Astro, traveling the universe, encountering and confronting social issues related to Blackness. In 2019, musician and poet Quentin Talley joined their storytelling collective, with each artist advancing the narrative within their specific mediumKiser and Woodberry produce the visual components—illustration, typography, animation, graphic design, and augmented reality (AR) installations—while Talley creates performative elements, including the music composed with his band, the Soul Providers.  

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Previous Installations

In Vivid Color: Pushing the Boundaries of Perception in Contemporary Art

October 16, 2020-February 28, 2021
Mint Museum Uptown

To celebrate Mint Museum Uptown’s tenth anniversary, In Vivid Color: Pushing the Boundaries of Perception in Contemporary Art brings together four innovative contemporary artists—Gisela Colon, Spencer Finch, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Summer Wheat—who create works celebrating the power of color and its transformative ability to permeate the space around us. Their work is juxtaposed with a selection of paintings and works on paper drawn primarily from The Mint Museum’s permanent collection that explore artists’ exploration of color in more traditional ways.

Spencer Finch (American, 1962–). Sunset, South Texas (detail), 6/21/03, 2003, fluorescent lights, filters. Courtesy of the artist.

The exhibition uses color as an opportunity to investigate how people perceive a non-fixed reality: the ever-shifting environment in which we must discern the real from the illusionary. The installations by Wheat, Finch, Colon, and Steinkamp are highly experiential, creating an environment that will engage each viewer uniquely, determined by the personal nature of color perception. Despite this subjective element, audiences experience the immersive installations simultaneously, fostering a sense of communion: we are united while remaining apart. This dichotomy replicates the sensation many feel as the COVID-19 pandemic requires much of our human contact to be mediated by technology, the media used by Colon, Finch, and Steinkamp.

Jennifer Steinkamp, Daisy Bell, 2008. Video installation. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London. Photo by Robert Wedemeyer.

Suspended in this state of near-but-apart, the works of
In Vivid Color remind us of the community in which we all belong, to which we all contribute.  

Summer Wheat’s Foragers spans four stories and 3,720 square feet in Mint Museum Uptown’s Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium. A myriad of vibrant panels give the illusion of stained glass, and fills the atrium’s 96 windows and weave a story of the people and workforce that have made Charlotte a thriving metropolis.

In contrast to the grand scale of the initial four installations, the 11 paintings and works on paper in the adjacent gallery allow for more intimate considerations of color’s potency. Whether abstract or figurative, each composition allows for different investigations into how color intersects with the work’s subject and meaning, in addition to affecting the  viewer’s space even when confined to a two-dimensional patch of wall.

Peter Halley (American, 1953–). Six Prisons, 2004, acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas. Gift of Ginger Kemp in honor of Mark Richard Leach. 2004.67
T.J. eddy (American, 1945–). Oh Say Do You See, 2008, acrylic on canvas. Museum Purchase: Exchange Funds from the gifts of Dr. and Mrs. Francis Robicsek, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott J. Neal, Charles McMurray, and Mrs. L. L. McMurray. 2008.65. © T.J. Redd Ry
Donald Sultan (American, 1951–). Aqua Poppies Dec 10, 2002, 2002, enamel, flocking, tar, spackle, tile, Masonite. Museum Purchase:  Charlotte Garden Club Fund and Exchange Funds from the Gift of Harry and Mary Dalton. 2003.90A-F. © Donald Sultan, 2002
Julian Stanczak (American, 1928–2017). Summer Inspite of Blue, 1967, acrylic on canvas. Gift of Bruce and Margo Evans. 2001.8. © Julian Stanczak

Interested in learning more?

Visit the In Vivid Color Resources page or the Mintwiki for In Vivid Color. Mintwiki is provided by The Mint Museum Library

In Vivid Color: Pushing the Boundaries of Perception in Contemporary Art is generously sponsored by Wells Fargo Private Bank and the Mint Museum Auxiliary

Wells fargo square logo
Mint Museum Auxiliary logo

Additional generous individual support provided by Mary Anne (M.A.) Rogers, Ann and Michael Tarwater, and Mozelle DePass Griffith in loving memory of Edward Colville Griffith, Jr.

Special thanks to Bank of America for loans of art for the presentation of this Mint-organized show.

John Leslie Breck: American Impressionist

Title Design for John Leslie Breck: American Impressionist

  Mint Museum Uptown
September 18, 2021 – January 2, 2022 (traveling thereafter) 

Inspired by The Mint Museum’s 2016 acquisition of John Leslie Breck’s canvas Suzanne Hoschedé-Monet Sewing, this exhibition includes approximately 70 of Breck’s finest works, drawn from public and private collections as well as the illustrious Terra Foundation collection of American art. Many of the works in the exhibition have not been on public view in more than a century.

In addition to Breck’s landscape-inspired works, the exhibition highlights his exploration of new styles and approaches to painting in the years before his early death at the age of 38. More than 10 related paintings by Breck’s French and American Impressionist colleagues, including Theodore Robinson, Willard Metcalf, and Lila Cabot Perry, are also featured in the exhibition.

John Leslie Breck (American, 1860-99). "Suzanne Hoschedé-Monet Sewing," 1888, oil on canvas. Gift of the Mint Museum Auxiliary and courtesy Heather James Fine Art. 2016.25

A look at the life of John Leslie Breck

In 1887, Breck was one of the founders of the American art colony at Giverny and was among the earliest American artists to embrace the Impressionist style. He was also one of the first to exhibit his Impressionist paintings in America and helped to popularize the style during his years working in the Boston area in the 1890s.

Between 1887 and 1888 he and a handful of his American colleagues began visiting the French village of Giverny, where they met Claude Monet and subsequently explored the new approach to painting that Monet had helped to pioneer. Breck’s canvases from this period, loosely brushed and filled with light and color, are a marked departure from his earlier works that are characterized by darker tonalities and tighter brushwork that typified the preferred style of the era. When Breck returned to America in 1892, he applied what he had learned to paintings of the New England landscape and frequently exhibited his work.

Along with his scenes of Giverny and America, this exhibition features a selection of paintings from his sojourn in Venice in 1897. Always interested exploring in new ways of seeing the world, Breck had begun to explore aspects of post-Impressionism and Asian aesthetics in the years before his early death, at the age of 39, in 1899

Want a deeper dive? Learn more about Breck and the other artists in the exhibition on Mintwiki, The Mint Museum Library’s exhibition resource site.

John Leslie Breck (American, 1860–99). Silence, ca. 1894, oil on canvas, 28½ x 47½ inches. Private Collection

Traveling Dates

 

Dixon Gallery & Gardens
Memphis, Tennessee
January 22–March 27, 2022

Figge Art Museum
Davenport, Iowa
May 28–August 21, 2022

Funding for this exhibition is provided by Bank of America, The Mint Museum Auxiliary, and The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts.

Mint Museum Auxiliary logo

Craft in the Laboratory: The Science of Making Things

Craft in the Laboratory: The Science of Making Things

Mint Museum Uptown
Opens February 12, 2022

Craft in the Laboratory: The Science of Making Things will be the first project in the Southeast to examine how craft artists and designers apply scientific and mathematical concepts in creating work and reveal parallel approaches to problem-solving among these makers and professionals in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). The acronym STEAM, which inserts art among the four other fields, emphasizes how they all intersect and reflects educators’ and arts professionals’ assertion of their equal importance in K-12 and college education. Craft in the Lab will build off STEAM-related programs created by the museum’s department of Learning & Engagement to explore this intersection in depth.

Craft in the Lab is the theme of the first reinstallation since 2010 of the Mint Museum’s permanent collection galleries of craft and design, which are organized by medium. It will be drawn entirely from the Mint’s collection of craft and design, which abounds with examples of artists thinking like scientists and engineers, and will include Project Ten Ten Ten. For example, Kate Malone’s Project Ten Ten Ten commission, Mr. & Mrs. Tutti Atomic, reflects her knowledge of the chemistry of clay bodies and glazes. Technical aspects of materials and processes will be conveyed through textual labels as well as videos.

Craft in the Lab will be accompanied by a catalog published by Dan Giles, Ltd.

Jute SquarePike BaskingA Dark TaleThresholdMr. and Mrs. Tutti AtomicRainbow Chair

The World of Anna Sui

The World of Anna Sui 

  Mint Museum Randolph
November 20, 2021 – May 1, 2022

The World of Anna Sui  presents 100 looks from the iconic designer’s archive with a roll call of 12 archetypes that capture the Sui aesthetic

The World of Anna Sui at The Mint Museum
Designer Anna Sui. Photograph copyright Joshua Jordan
Anna Sui on a runway surrounded by models wearing her fashion at her Spring 1994 show.
Anna Sui on a runway surrounded by models wearing her fashion at her Spring 1994 show. Image by Raoul Gatchalian/Courtesy of Anna Sui

No other fashion designer captures the zeitgeist of a historic period, place, or artistic movement in such a timeless yet contemporary look as Anna Sui. She does so by designing the entire look — from dress to accessories, hair styles to makeup, and even sound and scent.

The World of Anna Sui shines a spotlight on the designer’s heroes from her youth and the importance of her collaborators, including the New York City Garment District. The exhibition gives insights into her process, allowing the viewer to step inside her imagination and watch it unfold.

The first iteration of this exhibition debuted at the Fashion and Textile Museum, London, in the summer of 2017.

About the Artist

Anna Sui reinvented pop-culture fashion with her signature rock-and-roll romantic label in the 1990s. Unlike other popular American designers, Sui is driven by telling stories head-to-toe about the worlds of cowgirls, grunge girls, hippie chicks, hula girls, Mods, pirate rock stars, Pre-Raphaelite maidens, and surfer nomads.

Beginning with her premiere catwalk show in 1991, Sui has shaped not only the garments, textiles, accessories, cosmetics, and interiors that comprise her design universe, but also the course of fashion history by popularizing the boutique fashion look. Sui’s unique approach to creating narratives through her work is legendary. A self-taught historian of culture, art, and fashion, she  references music, books, exhibitions, movies, time periods, photography, and art movements in her designs.

Sui signature fashions, accessories, and products, explore wide-ranging materials and inspirations, including papier-mâché mannequin heads, linens by Vera, Claire McCardell sportswear, army surplus jackets, Japanese hankies, qipao dresses, wood-soled platforms from Goody Two-Shoes, the style of Jane Holzer, Zandra Rhodes, Nirvana, Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg, and Minnie Mouse. Her collections are replete with historicism, processed and creatively reimagined through her signature filter.

Organized by the Fashion and Textile Museum, London, The World of Anna Sui was curated by Dennis Nothdruft. Annie Carlano is curator of The Mint Museum’s iteration. The exhibition has toured the globe from New York to Shanghai. The Mint Museum is the last stop for the current international tour. 

Craving more? Check out Mintwiki, The Mint Museum Library’s exhibition resource site for all things Anna Sui.

Models walk the runway during the finale of the Anna Sui spring 2004 collection shown in New York's Bryant Park, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2003. (AP Photo/Stuart Ramson)

The exhibition organized by the Fashion Textile Museum, London is generously presented by PNC Financial Services. Generous individual support provided by Deidre and Clay Grubb, with additional support from the Mint Museum Auxiliary.

Additional individual support provided by Posey and Mark Mealy, Celene and Marc Oken, Kati and Chris Small, Ann and Michael Tarwater, Rocky and Curtis Trenkelbach, the Fashion Task Force, and friends of fashion.

Special thanks to:

Media Partners

Star Gallery

The Star Gallery is a place for students from around Charlotte to have their works displayed in The Mint Museum. The works presented rotate periodically to correspond with the themes present in our current special exhibitions and our permanent collection.

BURN YOUR ASSUMPTIONS | Spring-Summer 2020

Inspired by the Immersed In Light: Studio Drift at the Mint exhibition, Hough High School students worked to create pieces that explored the relationship between humanity, nature, and technology. Creating a dialogue about the in and out of body conversations we have with these relationships was our main focus. Throughout the work you can see that students worked with many materials, both tangible and digital. These works are from Katherine Allen’s Visual Art Honors and AP classes as well as Justin Pierce’s Media Arts Honors and AP classes.

Katherine Allen’s Visual Art Honors and AP classes

Justin Pierce’s Media Arts Honors and AP classes

porcelain Yucca plant with long stem coming out of the middle.

Michael Sherrill Retrospective

Michael Sherrill Retrospective

In his delicately rendered sculptures Michael Sherrill seeks to elicit a sense of wonder from viewers, and to make them see things fresh.

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Under Construction: Collage from The Mint Museum to open December 1 at Mint Museum Uptown

Drawing together nearly 100 works from the museum’s Modern & Contemporary Collection, Under Construction: Collage from The Mint Museum is the museum’s first exhibition to focus on this dynamic, engaging medium. This technique, in which materials from different sources are cut, torn, and layered to create new meanings and narratives, experienced a renaissance after World War II, due in large part to Charlotte native Romare Bearden, whose work plays a special role in this exhibition.

The exhibition will be open to Mint members only on Friday, November 30; it opens to the public on Saturday, December 1. A party celebrating the exhibition and featuring artists, lenders, donors, and Mint members is scheduled for January 31, 2019 – check mintmuseum.org/events for details.

Bearden has long had a special place at The Mint Museum, which maintains a gallery dedicated to his work at Mint Museum Uptown. In this special exhibition, he and his work serve as a point of departure to explore the medium for which he is best known.

“It was great fun pulling together Under Construction,” noted Dr. Jonathan Stuhlman, Senior Curator of American, Modern, and Contemporary Art. “This is the first time that the museum has examined this fascinating technique in depth in a special exhibition. It also was exciting to think about how the work of Romare Bearden (which is found throughout the exhibition) relates to that of so many other artists in the collection. Under Construction is filled with dynamic, thought-provoking objects that are sure to inspire and delight our visitors.”

Under Construction explores not only classic collages including those by Bearden, but also the wide range of ways in which the technique has inspired artists and impacted other forms of art, from painting and printmaking to photography and assemblage. Featuring more than 30 international artists, Under Construction will explore the growth and impact of the collage technique from the 1950s to the present. It will include more than a dozen works by Bearden, as well as examples by such notable artists as Sam Gilliam, Robert Motherwell, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Shepard Fairey, Howardena Pindell, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist.

Visitors will be able to discover how eight inventive contemporary artists have continued to mine the medium recent years in a section titled “New Directions.” Although drawn primarily from the rich holdings of The Mint Museum, this exhibition will also include special loans from private collections.

The exhibition is organized by The Mint Museum. Media partners are The Charlotte Observer, Pride Magazine, and Peachy.

Media and special guests are invited to preview the exhibition at 10 AM on Friday, November 30 at Mint Museum Uptown at Levine Center for the Arts, 500 South Tryon Street. Light refreshments will be served and interviews with the curator and select artists will be available. RSVP to leigh.dyer@mintmuseum.org.

Street view with multi-patterned clothing seen throughout. Patterns made from traditional wax printing

‘African-Print Fashion Now!’ to open at Mint Museum Randolph

African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style introduces audiences to the dynamic traditions of African dress featuring colorful, boldly patterned printed cloth. The exhibition, opening to the public at Mint Museum Randolph October 7 following two days of Mint member previews, highlights the interplay between regional preferences and cosmopolitanism that has long flourished on the continent, while highlighting the expansiveness of 21st-century African-print fashion.

The exhibition will be open to Mint members on Friday, October 5 from 11 AM-6 PM and Saturday October 6 from 1-6 PM, and will open to the public on Sunday, October 7 from 1-5 PM. Two fashion designers with work featured in the exhibition, Titi Ademola and Alexis Temomanin, will be in Charlotte from Thursday through Sunday and are available for media interviews. Sunday’s event includes a public talk with both designers from 2-3 PM, free after museum admission. Public opening day also includes a drumming performance and a light reception with cash bar. Ademola, a Ghanian/Nigerian designer, is founder of the KIKI label, while Temomanin is the British-Ivorian founder of menswear brand Dent de Man.

African-Print Fashion Now!, organized by the Fowler Museum at UCLA, expands the Mint’s presentations of contemporary fashion into a broader cultural arena, and continues the Mint’s emphasis on presenting exhibitions that represent diverse voices and backgrounds. “This exhibition aligns with our mission to explore the meaning of fashion in a global 21st-century context,” said Annie Carlano, Senior Curator of Craft, Design, & Fashion at the Mint. “From the bold, dynamic cloth, to the inventive, sculptural silhouettes, the textiles and fashions in this exhibition have inspired and infiltrated Western fashion, art, music, and popular culture.”

“The Mint is honored to be one of three venues for this important exhibition, and very pleased to collaborate with the Fowler Museum, UCLA, for the first time,” said Dr. Todd Herman, PhD, President & CEO of the Mint. “Additionally, we are deeply grateful to Charlotte’s own Michael Gallis for his role in bringing this exhibition to our community.”

The works featured throughout the exhibition demonstrate the vital role that African-print has played in the expression of beauty, fashion, and heritage, while creating transcultural connections across Africa and into the larger world.

The exhibition is complemented by an interactive design studio created by the Mint’s Learning & Engagement team, offering visitors of all ages opportunities to design their own prints, experience African-print fabrics, and go on a scavenger hunt through the exhibition.

Four sections weaving multiple themes

The exhibition is organized into four sections: “It All Starts with Cloth,” “Portraits in Print,” “Regional Styles, Fashion Preferences,” and “New Directions.” Collectively, the installation includes dozens of tailored fashions, nearly 100 archival and contemporary cloths, approximately 20 black-and-white studio portrait photographs from the 1960s and 1970s, a series of runway videos, and several works by contemporary visual artists. Ensembles on view draw from the Fowler’s collections, private loans, and the extensive archives of the Dutch textile manufacturing company Vlisco.

Several themes weave their way throughout the exhibition, mimicking the cyclical nature of fashion trends and the ripple effects of politics and technology on the formation of identity. One theme is consumer agency, both in determining designs and patterns through purchasing power and by commissioning unique ensembles from seamstresses and tailors. Another theme is the theatrical power of fashion, and its ability to express individualism or collective solidarity, whether in a family portrait or Women’s Day Marches in communities across the continent. Finally, a link between imaging and fashion surfaces in each section of the exhibition. From formal portraiture to visual arts to ubiquitous African fashion calendars to street style photos shared by cell-phone, it is clear that representations of fashion have always been a nuanced form of communication.

Fashion subtly communicates about place, heritage, and belonging through such means as appropriation, pastiche, and revival. Throughout the exhibition, African-print fashions are considered to be creative responses to key historical moments and empowering projections about Africa’s future.

About the Exhibition

“It All Starts with Cloth” addresses the history of African-print textiles, originally inspired by batik or wax-resist cloth from Indonesia. A dense grid of more than 60 cloths manufactured in Europe, Africa, and Asia evokes the vibrating colors and designs stocked in open-air markets and cloth shops across the African continent. A visual timeline of production across these regions outlines the history of the cloth trade in West and Central Africa from the 1800s to the present. Archival photographs and dramatic film footage of the Vlisco factory in operation transport audiences to the production of cloth in the Netherlands.

“Portraits in Print” leaves behind the brightly colored world of African-print fashion and enters an intimate black-and-white space of memory. A gallery introduces four photographers from Africa’s “golden age” of black-and-white photography in the 1960s and 1970s: Francis K. Honny (Ghana, 1914–1998); Jacques Toussele (Cameroon, 1935–2017); Omar Ly (Senegal, 1943–2016); and Mory Bamba (b. Mali, 1949). Their photography studios in newly independent West African countries provided a platform for an ascending middle class to see themselves and be seen by one another. The portraits are indicative of a historical moment when local African-print ensemble styles gained new significance as expressions of national and Pan-African pride and identity.

“Regional Styles, Fashion Preferences” takes an in-depth look at localized contemporary African-print fashion whereby stylish dress is a feature of daily life. Ensembles on view from Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Nigeria, and Senegal reflect an array of styles, all of them customized and individually made to order. This section presents a case study from Kumasi, Ghana to illustrate the interactive commissioning process between seamstresses or tailors and their fashion-conscious clientele. The bold patterns of the cloth engineered with subtle and striking variations in style reveal the ingenuity and flair of regional designers.

“New Directions” bridges regional cultures with transnational art and fashion networks, beginning with African-print styles on global runways in Paris, New York, Dakar, and other cities. Designers in this section include Titi Ademola (b. London, based in Ghana), Ituen Bassey (b. Nigeria), Afua Dabanka (b. Germany, based in Ghana), Lisa Folawiyo (b. Nigeria), Adama Amanda Ndiaye (b. Democratic Republic of the Congo, based in Senegal), Alexis Temomanin (b. Côte d’Ivoire), Gilles Touré (b. Côte d’Ivoire), and Patricia Waota (b. Côte d’Ivoire). Ensembles on view feature full-length gowns and men’s blazers, metallic wax print, and architectural pleating and boning—all of which harmoniously marry the drape of the fabric with the strategic construction of print patterns for stunning results.

Juxtaposed with these glamorous designs are contemporary works by photographers and other visual artists who incorporate print-cloth imagery to convey evocative messages about heritage, hybridity, displacement, and aspiration.

Members of the media and invited special guests are invited to preview the exhibition from 5:30-7 PM on Thursday October 4 at Mint Museum Randolph, 2730 Randolph Road in Charlotte. Light refreshments, wine, and beer will be served. RSVP to Leigh.Dyer@mintmuseum.org.

Publication

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated volume generously funded by the R. L. Shep Endowment Fund at the Fowler Museum. The publication includes essays authored by exhibition co-curators Suzanne Gott, Kristyne S. Loughran, Betsy D. Quick, and Leslie W. Rabine with additional essays contributed by Kathleen Bickford Berzock, Boatema Boateng, M. Amah Edoh, Helen Elands, Anne Grosfilley, Karen Tranberg-Hansen, Helen Jennings, Sandra Klopper, Stephan F. Miescher, Hansi Momodu-Gordon, John Picton, Elisha P. Renne, Victoria L. Rovine, Ken Aïcha Sy, and Nina Sylvanus. It is on sale for $40 in both locations of the Mint Museum stores.

Credit

African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style is organized by the Fowler Museum at UCLA in association with Vlisco Netherlands B.V. It is guest curated by Suzanne Gott with Kristyne S. Loughran, Betsy D. Quick, and Leslie W. Rabine. In Charlotte, Annie Carlano, Senior Curator of Craft, Design, & Fashion, is the project curator. Major funding is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts with the additional support of R. L. Shep, DutchCulture, and Pasadena Art Alliance.

The exhibition is presented in Charlotte by PNC Financial Services with generous additional support from the Mint Museum Auxiliary, Wells Fargo Private Bank, and Moore & Van Allen.

ABOUT THE FOWLER MUSEUM

The Fowler Museum at UCLA explores global arts and cultures with an emphasis on works from Africa, Asia, the Pacific, and the Americas—past and present. The Fowler enhances understanding of world cultures through dynamic exhibitions, publications, and public programs, informed by interdisciplinary approaches and the perspectives of the cultures represented. Also featured is the work of international contemporary artists presented within the complex frameworks of politics, culture, and social action.

 

Above image:

Lekan Jeyifo and Walé Oyéjidé, Johannesburg 2081 A.D., Africa 2081 A.D. series, 2014; Digital print. Courtesy Ikiré Jones.