A Conversation About Classic Black: Basalt Sculpture, Design, and a Palette of Pastels

A Conversation About Classic Black: Basalt Sculpture, Design, and a Palette of Pastels

Join this virtual gallery tour and chat about the exhibition Classic Black: The Basalt Sculpture of Wedgwood and His Contemporaries with Brian Gallagher, Senior Curator of Decorative Art; HannaH Crowell, Exhibition Designer, and Owl, exhibition Artist. Hosted by the Mint’s Director of Community Relations Rubie Britt-Height, the program highlights the three galleries featured in the exhibition, several specific works of art, and how classic and contemporary reimagined creates a marriage between the works of art and the design palette.

The Mint Museum From Home is presented by Chase.

Virtually tour the Mint’s art storage area with a museum professional

Virtually tour the Mint’s art storage area with a museum professional

Julia Kraft, the Mint’s Assistant Registrar, walks you through the Mint’s art storage areas to show you a behind-the-scenes look at here we keep our objects when they are not on display.

This program was originally a live event, and has a Q+A segment at the end where she answers participants questions.

The Mint Museum From Home is presented by Chase.

Art that reveres Native American culture and craft

Three works of art that remind us to revere Native American culture and craft

By Annie Carlano, Senior Curator of Craft, Design & Fashion, and Rebecca Elliot, Assistant Curator of Craft, Design & Fashion

Native American Heritage Day is celebrated the last Friday of November. Designated by President George W. Bush in 2008, it celebrates and recognizes the importance of Native Americans and their cultural heritage to our past, present, and future. Works of art by Native American artists encapsulate tradition, rich artistry, and stories that are passed down through generations. The Mint Museum’s Native Americas collection showcases works from Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Guatemala, from the nineteenth century to today. Objects from the Native Americas collection are on view at Mint Museum Randolph, as well as the Craft+Design galleries at Mint Museum Uptown. Following are three works of art by Native American artists that chronicle their roots, relationships, and environments.

Diego Romero 

Diego Romero (Cochiti, 1964–). Bowl, late 20th century, earthenware with slip paint. Gift of Gretchen and Nelson Grice. 2017.43.34

 

This bowl is part of an ongoing series of ceramics and prints by Diego Romero that chronicles the adventures of the Chongo Brothers, named for a characteristic hairstyle of Navajo and Pueblo people, a bun gathered at the nape of the neckthe chongo. Romero’s ceramics are impeccably hand built with local clays from the hills of Northern New Mexico.

The strong graphic design is a combination of geometric motifs related to ancient Mimbres pottery, pop art and comic-strip aesthetics. Chronicling the societal injustice rampant on and off the reservation, Diego Romero sometimes softens these difficult narratives with his cartoonish style.

Trained at UCLA, his work is included in museums and private collections in the US and Europe. In 2019 Diego Romero received the Native Treasures Living Treasures Award, given to artists who have made outstanding contributions to indigenous arts and culture. 

Diego Romero ceramics are hand built with clay from the hills of Northern New Mexico. Courtesy of Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Diego Romero’s bowl is on view at Mint Museum Randolph, in an installation featuring Pueblo ceramics from the Grice Collection. Experience more of Romero’s work through a virtual tour of his current solo exhibition at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, New Mexico, Diego Romero vs. The End of Art

 


Susan Point 

A collection of wooden circles surrounding a large disk with two fish carved into it
Susan Point (Canadian, Coast Salish [Musqueam First Nation], 1952–), Salmon Spawning Run, 2012, carved and painted Western red cedar. Project Ten Ten Ten commission. Museum Purchase: Funds provided by Fleur Bresler, Libba and Mike Gaither, Laura and Mike Grace, Betsy and Brian Wilder, Amy and Alfred Dawson, Aida and Greg Saul, Missy Luczak Smith and Doug Smith, Beth and Drew Quartapella, and Kim Blanding. 2012.107. Art © Susan Point 2012. Image © Mint Museum of Art, Inc. © Susan Point, 2012.

 

The round shape of Salmon Spawning Run is based on Susan Point’s well-established spindle whorl motif, which represents the Coast Salish, a First Nations tribe. For thousands of years salmon have sustained the Coast Salish people as the primary food source. As such, salmon are highly honored and respected. Symbolizing abundance, prosperity, renewal, and fertility, the fish and their eggs are depicted here in a composition that reminds us of the importance of clean water other sustainable resources to protect our natural environment. cedar from a tree trunk found on communal land, and painted the carved wood with natural pigments.  

Susan Point’s artwork symbolizes the natural resources that are central to life of the Coast Salish, a First Nations tribe. Image courtesy of the artist

One of a group of artists responsible for the resurgence of Coast Salish art and culture, her public art projects include works at Vancouver International Airport and the Museum of the American Indian, in Washington, D.C. She has received numerous awards including the Order of Canada, Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, and a British Columbia Lifetime Achievement Award. 

Salmon Spawning Run is a part of Project Ten Ten Ten and is a site-specific work on view in the Craft & Design galleries at Mint Museum Uptown. 


Tara Locklear 

Tara Locklear (United States), Bobble for Bob Necklace, circa 2017, walnut, laser cut plexiglass, recycled skateboards, costume jewelry, oxidized sterling silver, and other mixed media. Gift of Porter • Price Collection. 2019.93.117

 

Tara Locklear’s one-of a kind jewelery is inspired by her environments and includes repurposed elements, such as wooden skateboards. Image courtesy of the artist

Tara Locklear’s jewelry is inspired by urban environments and includes repurposed elements such as pieces of wooden skateboards. She made this necklace as a tribute to her jewelry professor and mentor, Robert Ebendorf, after his retirement from East Carolina University (ECU). Its materials range from ones she explored as a student there to ones she focuses on in her current practice. Locklear earned a BFA in Small Metals and Jewelry Design from ECU in 2012. She lives and works in Raleigh, North Carolina and is a member of the Lumbee Tribe. 

Celebrating the power of women in art: The Mint Museum and Charlotte Symphony Orchestra

Celebrating the power of women in art:

A special collaboration between The Mint Museum and Charlotte Symphony Orchestra

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Mint Museum Uptown and the Mint’s new installation Foragers, the Mint partnered with Charlotte Symphony Orchestra to create a short film that unites visual and performing arts.

The artistic collaboration features four female musicians from the Charlotte Symphony playing classical compositions in front of artist Summer Wheat’s contemporary work of art in the Mint’s Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium.

We welcome you to experience the power of women in art presented at the intersection of art, architecture, and music.

This special presentation is brought to you by:

Wells Fargo 'the private bank' logo

The Mint Museum From Home is Sponsored by Chase.

A Conversation with Summer Wheat, the artist behind Foragers

A Conversation with Summer Wheat

Summer Wheat, the artist behind Foragers, a monumental tribute to women workers of North Carolina installed at Mint Museum Uptown, sits down with Jen Sudul Edwards, PHD, the Mint’s Chief Curator, to discuss the inspiration and evolution of the piece. Foragers spans four stories and 3,720 square feet in Mint Museum Uptown’s Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium. A myriad of vibrant panels that give the illusion of stained glass fill the atrium’s 96 windows and weave a story of women who labor to build the communities that form the spine of modern society.

The Mint Museum From Home is Sponsored by Chase.

Holiday decor at Mint Museum Store

Add more merry at home with artful holiday decor

Whether it’s glamor and dazzle, or comfort and cozy you seek, bring holiday cheer home with these locally-sourced and inspired items available at the Mint Museum Store. From art-inspired decor to gifts for all ages and styles, there’s something for everyone on your gift list.

This year, Museum Store Sunday is extended to a full week. Save 29% on all regular-priced items in the store November 29-December 6. Just mention Museum Store Sunday at check out.

Flocked Green Stags Head, $100; and Frontier Platter, $64.
Limited Mint Edition Starworks (NC) Handblown Glass Ornaments, $28
Colorful Slim Champagne Glasses, $14 each

 

Multicolored Sequin LED Light Up Trees, $14-$22
Flocked Red HoHoHo’s (Set of 3), $28; and Flocked Green Trees, $10-$64

Sew a Soft Sculpture Inspired by Nick Cave’s Soundsuits

SoftSculpt(1)

Sew a Soft Sculpture Inspired by Nick Cave’s Soundsuits

So, what is a soft sculpture? A soft sculpture is a 3D form that is made from soft materials like cloth, foam, paper, or other flexible materials. Soft sculptures can range from fine art pieces in exhibitions to comforting toys.

Get inspired to design and hand sew your own soft sculpture with this lesson inspired by a series of sculptures called Soundsuits by fabric sculptor, performance artist, educator, and dancer Nick Cave.


About the Artist:

Nick Cave began working with fabric at a young age by manipulating hand-me-down clothing from his older siblings. His work is inspired by an array of things, from the experience of being Black in America, to African art traditions, to haute-couture fashion. Cave has created over 500 Soundsuits since he created his first one in 1992. The Soundsuits serve as a sort of armor that distorts the wearer’s figure and hides their identity.

“The Soundsuits hide gender, race, class and they force you to look at the work without judgment.”

-Nick Cave

By Bowmanga1278 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0
Nick Cave (American, 1959–). Soundsuit, 2007, metal, beads, sequins, metal Victorian flowers. Museum Purchase: Founders' Circle Annual Cause. 2009.19.1A-OOOOO. © Nick Cave
Nick Cave (American, 1959–). Soundsuit, 2007, metal, beads, sequins, metal Victorian flowers. Museum Purchase: Founders' Circle Annual Cause. 2009.19.1A-OOOOO. © Nick Cave

SUPPLIES:

• Paper & drawing utensil
• Fabric – Use something from home like an old dress shirt or linens. Choose fabric without much stretch because sewing on stretchy fabric can be challenging. If purchasing fabric, choose something cotton, as cotton is easily drawn and painted on.
• Polyester fiber fill – Alternatives include cotton batting, stuffing from an old pillow, rice.
• Needle & thread
• Straight pins
• Scissors
• Skewer or chopstick for filling
• Strong glue – Elmer’s Glue-All, Alene’s Tacky Glue, or fabric glue
• Embellishments (See optional supplies)

OPTIONAL SUPPLIES:

• Fabric markers/Sharpies
• Acrylic paints
• Yarn
• Embroidery thread
• Beads & bells
• Sequins & gems
• Pom poms
• Sewing machine


Instructions:

1. Plan your design and pattern.

Sketch out what you want your sculpture to look like, and then draw a pattern for your design. To create a sewing pattern, draw and cut out each piece of your sculpture onto any type of paper or cardboard. Then trace the cut pieces of your pattern onto the fabric to guide you in cutting your fabric. Keep in mind that this is a sculpture not an item of clothing, so you’re pieces of fabric don’t need to be perfectly symmetrical. You can even try to freehand draw the pieces of your pattern onto your fabric.

This simple, 4-piece Soundsuit pattern includes a front side, a matching back side, and two identical legs. Make the leg pieces twice as thick and a few inches longer than desired. Each leg will be folded in half and sewn together to create a cylinder shape when filled. The extra length at the upper end of each leg will be sewn inside of the body.

Tip: Limit the pattern to simple shapes. Details will be lost when pieces are sewn together. Also, make your pattern an inch larger than you want your sculpture because you will lose some of the size.

2. Cut the pieces of your pattern out of your fabric and pin together pieces where you will be sewing.

Mark a line along the edge to help guide where to sew.

3. Use a running stitch to sew together pinned pieces about a ¼ inch away from the edge.

A running stitch is when the needle and thread pass over and under. Keep the stitches tight to strengthen the bond between the two pieces, and carefully remove pins as you go. Leave the bottom edge of the body and the top of each leg open to fill.

4. Turn the stitched pieces inside out to hide the raw edges of the fabric and create a cleaner look.

Skip this step if you prefer to see the edges.

5. Fill the legs with stuffing.

Use a skewer, chopstick, or long handled utensil to help pack filling and reach small areas like the toes. After the legs are filled, halfway fill the body with stuffing, and then position legs inside the body before you finish filling the body. Be sure to leave enough space so that the bottom edge of the body can be stitched closed with the legs inside.

6. Pin the bottom edge closed and using a running stitch to stitch close the body.

This completes the structure of the soft sculpture.

7. To finish the sculpture, add embellishments and surface design.

This is your opportunity to personalize your sculpture. Use markers, paint, found objects, and fiber materials to strengthen your Soundsuit ‘s appearance.

Begin with markers and paints if you want to add color and pattern to the fabric. Once that dries, add the three-dimensional decorations using different embroidery techniques and glue.

Ideas for surface design:

• Couching using a chunky yarn. Couching is a type of embroidery where thread is laid down on the surface and then stitched over with small stitches to hold it in place. A thicker yarn makes the process go faster and gives the sculpture a plush feel.
• Thread long pieces of twine through the sculpture and then tie beads to the end. This makes a great clacking sound when the beads knock against each other.
• Glue sequins or any other small objects to the surface.


Challenge: Create your own pattern to sew. Think of ways to add more pieces and dimensions to the sculpture.

Simplify: Fill a sock with stuffing and sew it closed. Add embellishments to the outside.


Learn More:

There is so much to look at and learn about Nick Cave and his hundreds of Soundsuits. Check out the resources below to learn more about Nick Cave and his work:

https://publicdelivery.org/nick-cave-soundsuits/

https://art21.org/artist/nick-cave/

Share a picture of your creation and tag us @themintmuseum on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

 

This idea brought to you by Zoe Whiteside

The Mint Museum From Home is Presented By Chase.

A man standing on the patio space at Mint Museum Uptown looking at a structure made of metal rods.

Intersect Chicago Studio Talks

Mint curator Annie Carlano presents studios talks with artists Danny Lane, Tom Joyce, and Kate Malone at inaugural Intersect Chicago art fair

In celebration of the tenth anniversary of Project Ten Ten Ten, The Mint Museum is presenting studio talks with three featured artists: Tom Joyce, Danny Lane, and Kate Malone. In conversation with Annie Carlano, Senior Curator of Craft, Design & Fashion at The Mint Museum, the artists will discuss the impact of The Mint Museum commissions on their work, as well current and future projects as part of Intersect Chicago.

More than 100 exhibitors are part of the Intersect Art and Design roster for the inaugural edition of Intersect Chicago, the virtual art fair replacing SOFA Chicago for the 2020 edition due to COVID-19. Intersect Chicago will be online from November 6-12, 2020.

The fair is the evolution of SOFA – Sculpture Objects Functional Art. It is the intersection of art, design, and objects, including daily highlights on glass, contemporary art, design, ceramic and craft, outsider art, fiber, and public art/sculpture. Intersect Chicago will feature institutions from around the globe, including The Mint Museum, with dedicated programming and a selection of galleries showcasing work of these disciplines. Cultural partners of Intersect Chicago will be featured on different days of the fair with special programming, talks, virtual tours, and more. See the full schedule.

Visit the Fair on Artsy

Intersect Chicago has partnered with Artsy, the global marketplace for discovering and collecting art. In addition to accessing the fair through IntersectChicago.com, visitors may also visit the fair through Artsy. As Intersect Chicago’s Main Marketplace Partner, Artsy provides a unique opportunity for exhibiting galleries to promote their virtual booths to Artsy’s global audience. Collectors can experience Intersect Chicago on Artsy to discover artists, save favorite works, view works on their home walls through Artsy’s AR mobile tool and directly purchase work from galleries.

Fall into fashion with these seasonal picks from The Mint Museum Store

Fall into fashion with these picks from The Mint Museum Store

Our fun and funky Peruvian Trading Company hats, gloves, arm warmers, ponchos and headbands, and even dog sweaters make the perfect gift and are always a seasonal favorite. Celebrate the coming chilly weather, and one of our favorite vendors, with a special pop-up sale. Enjoy 25% off Peruvian Trading Company’s handmade wonders through the end of October.

Peruvian Trading Company Hand-Knit CLT Hat with Pompom, $22 / CLT Hand/Arm Warmers, $18

Peruvian Trading Company Hand-Knit Peace Sign Hat with Pompom, $22

Peruvian Trading Company Hand-Knit Headbands, $22

Peruvian Trading Company Hand-Knit Spider Hat, $58

Klimt Silk Artist Tie, $58 / Klimt Cufflinks, $72 / Newgate Drummer Watch, $208

Bracken Explorer’s Hat, $72

Fair trade, hand-embroidered clutch from Thailand and fair trade hand-embroidered mask from Mexico (assorted designs and colors), $32 / $22

Sarah Cavender Metalworks jewelry and scarf. Each piece is hand crafted in Oxford, Alabama and made by local artisans under the supervision of Jewelry Designer Sarah Cavender. Square Cobra Necklace (Bottom Right), $174 / Knotted Snake Necklace (Bottom Left), $130 / Long Gold Chain, $120 / Short Gold Chain, $68 / Short Rose Chain, $68 / Interlocking Disk Earrings, $92 / Open Weave Metal Scarf, $250

Fair trade from Nepal felted oversized bag with three interchangeable felted flowers, $118