In Vivid Color: Pushing the Boundaries of Perception in Contemporary Art

October 16, 2020-February 28, 2021
Mint Museum Uptown

To celebrate Mint Museum Uptown’s tenth anniversary, In Vivid Color: Pushing the Boundaries of Perception in Contemporary Art brings together four innovative contemporary artists—Gisela Colon, Spencer Finch, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Summer Wheat—who create works celebrating the power of color and its transformative ability to permeate the space around us. Their work is juxtaposed with a selection of paintings and works on paper drawn primarily from The Mint Museum’s permanent collection that explore artists’ exploration of color in more traditional ways.

Spencer Finch (American, 1962–). Sunset, South Texas (detail), 6/21/03, 2003, fluorescent lights, filters. Courtesy of the artist.

The exhibition uses color as an opportunity to investigate how people perceive a non-fixed reality: the ever-shifting environment in which we must discern the real from the illusionary. The installations by Wheat, Finch, Colon, and Steinkamp are highly experiential, creating an environment that will engage each viewer uniquely, determined by the personal nature of color perception. Despite this subjective element, audiences experience the immersive installations simultaneously, fostering a sense of communion: we are united while remaining apart. This dichotomy replicates the sensation many feel as the COVID-19 pandemic requires much of our human contact to be mediated by technology, the media used by Colon, Finch, and Steinkamp.

Jennifer Steinkamp, Daisy Bell, 2008. Video installation. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London. Photo by Robert Wedemeyer.

Suspended in this state of near-but-apart, the works of
In Vivid Color remind us of the community in which we all belong, to which we all contribute.  

Summer Wheat’s Foragers spans four stories and 3,720 square feet in Mint Museum Uptown’s Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium. A myriad of vibrant panels give the illusion of stained glass, and fills the atrium’s 96 windows and weave a story of the people and workforce that have made Charlotte a thriving metropolis.

In contrast to the grand scale of the initial four installations, the 11 paintings and works on paper in the adjacent gallery allow for more intimate considerations of color’s potency. Whether abstract or figurative, each composition allows for different investigations into how color intersects with the work’s subject and meaning, in addition to affecting the  viewer’s space even when confined to a two-dimensional patch of wall.

Peter Halley (American, 1953–). Six Prisons, 2004, acrylic, fluorescent acrylic, and Roll-a-Tex on canvas. Gift of Ginger Kemp in honor of Mark Richard Leach. 2004.67
T.J. eddy (American, 1945–). Oh Say Do You See, 2008, acrylic on canvas. Museum Purchase: Exchange Funds from the gifts of Dr. and Mrs. Francis Robicsek, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott J. Neal, Charles McMurray, and Mrs. L. L. McMurray. 2008.65. © T.J. Redd Ry
Donald Sultan (American, 1951–). Aqua Poppies Dec 10, 2002, 2002, enamel, flocking, tar, spackle, tile, Masonite. Museum Purchase:  Charlotte Garden Club Fund and Exchange Funds from the Gift of Harry and Mary Dalton. 2003.90A-F. © Donald Sultan, 2002
Julian Stanczak (American, 1928–2017). Summer Inspite of Blue, 1967, acrylic on canvas. Gift of Bruce and Margo Evans. 2001.8. © Julian Stanczak

Interested in learning more?

Visit the In Vivid Color Resources page or the Mintwiki for In Vivid Color. Mintwiki is provided by The Mint Museum Library

In Vivid Color: Pushing the Boundaries of Perception in Contemporary Art is generously sponsored by Wells Fargo Private Bank and the Mint Museum Auxiliary

Wells fargo square logo
Mint Museum Auxiliary logo

Additional generous individual support provided by Mary Anne (M.A.) Rogers, Ann and Michael Tarwater, and Mozelle DePass Griffith in loving memory of Edward Colville Griffith, Jr.

Special thanks to Bank of America for loans of art for the presentation of this Mint-organized show.

New Days, New Works

On view through January 3, 2021 | Mint Museum Uptown

As we retreated to our homes in the midst of a global pandemic, perspectives changed and new views evolved. The usual became unusual. We saw familiar things with new eyes. New Days, New Works celebrates these renewed perspectives for objects that we surround ourselves with each day and never-before-seen works of art from The Mint Museum’s collections, including a number of gifts from individual and corporate donors.

Decorative subheading: About the Exhibition

More than 80 works of art — including photography and sculptures from international artists, vivid paintings, fashion accessories and stunning ceramics — evoke emotions and a new perspective for a new day.

The exhibition is a juxtaposition of color, material, time and place, from the recently acquired Arco by Puerto Rican artist Cristina Cordova to the strikingly colorful acrylic painting With Side, With Shoulder by Brooklyn-based artist Summer Wheat to Pilar Albarracín’s Ceiling of Offerings, a large-scale installation made up of hundreds of colorful flamenco dresses that hang from the ceiling.

New Days, New Works is organized by The Mint Museum and kicks off a year-long celebration of gifts in the Mint’s collections — American, contemporary, craft, design and fashion, and decorative arts — that represent the broad diversity of artwork that defines The Mint Museum.

Decorative subheading: Our collectors make it possible

Each object in New Days, New Works celebrates our relationships with individual donors, corporations, foundations and support groups that are all part of The Mint Museum community. We appreciate their generosity and the collection’s presence in our lives, even more after being away for so long.

You are part of our community, too, and we are profoundly grateful that you have joined us today. Welcome back.

Interested in learning more?

[TOP]: Pilar Albarracin (Spanish, 1968–). Ceiling of Offerings, 2004, fabric (flamenco dresses). Gift of the Heather and Tony Podesta Collection. 2011.80.1.1-724

Messages for the City

Messages for the City

Throughout the fall of 2020, The Mint Museum will present Messages for the City, artist-made images and animations that recognize and celebrate the work of frontline and essential workers during the COVID pandemic, on the Wells Fargo screen located on the Levine Center for the Arts. An array of five images for five minutes will play every hour on the hour, with each image or animation playing for 55 seconds, followed by the artist’s credit.

This project originated with Times Square Arts, a New York City agency that commissions and presents work primarily in Times Square. Messages for the City began in April 2020. With collaborators Poster House, PRINT magazine, and For Freedoms, Times Square Arts launched a public art campaign of public service announcements and messages of gratitude in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In a statement, Times Square Arts explains: “The public art initiative began with a sense of urgency to express solidarity and gratitude to the city’s most vulnerable workers, and it continues as a way to honor their work and acknowledge the myriad of challenges still facing us through both pandemic and protest.” The Mint Museum is proud to extend the reach of these messages to Charlotte. Here, too, we are seeing our neighbors and fellow citizens with new appreciation.

Over three dozen artists participated in this original campaign; The Mint Museum will present 17 in the Charlotte iteration. They include from For Freedoms: Paula Crown, Nekisha Durrett, Alixa Garcia, G.O.N.G./Mel Chin, Jenny Holzer, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, Pedro Reyes, Duke Riley, Christine Sun Kim, Carrie Mae Weems, and Christine Wong Yap; and from Poster House: Pablo Delcan, Joe Hollier, Maira Kalman, Richard McGuire, Gemma O’Brien, and Klaas Verplancke.

Airing out the “Dirty” Laundry

Airing Out the “Dirty” Laundry

On View at Mint Museum Uptown
Through November 29, 2020

Local visual artist Andrea Downs created the Airing Out the “Dirty” Laundry installation to capture the spirit of women by creating opportunities for them share their stories in their own words. These stories of strength, unity, hope, injustice, and exclusion are joined together on a clothesline. A community art movement, the installation is ever growing, and women can participate by adding their stories to the collection. Airing Out the “Dirty” Laundry is a call to gather, to listen and be heard—and to resist hate and injustice by fostering love and understanding.

Katherine Boxall

Constellation CLT logo

Katherine Boxall

February 18–May 3, 2020

About The Artist

Katherine Boxall constructs large-scale canvases that incorporate a ground of lush oil and pastels that explode with saturated color.

Boxall, who completed her MFA at San Francisco Art Institute and moved to Charlotte in the summer of 2018, creates in her west Charlotte studio, a haven for her work with acrylics, spray paint, pastels and oils. She began as a figurative painter. She gradually loosened her lines, breaking down the form of the body into broad expanses and elongated, rounded contours. Since 2018, Boxall has worked primarily in abstraction.


See more from Boxall at katherineboxall.com and on Instagram @katherineboxall

Look inside Charlotte-based artist Katherine Boxall’s west Charlotte studio. Boxall was the Mint’s first Constellation CLT artist of 2020, and in partnership with the Young Affiliates of the Mint, the Mint’s Chief Curator and Curator of Contemporary Art Jen Sudul Edwards, PhD, chats with Boxall to give us a glimpse into the artist’s creative process, her striking works of art, and the studio where it all comes together.

Atrium:

Maple Candy, 2019. Acrylic, oil, spray paint, and pastel on canvas, 96 x 72 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Black Licorice, 2020. Acrylic, oil, and spray paint on canvas, 96 x 72 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Tread, 2020. Acrylic, oil, spray paint, and pastel on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.

Burnt Bubblegum, 2018. Acrylic, oil, spray paint, and pastel on canvas, 96 x 72 in. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Mezzanine:

Milk IV, 2020. Acrylic, pastel, graphite, charcoal, spray paint, and oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.

 

4th floor:

Pink Yeti, 2018. Fluff and pastel, 36 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Barbie x Rothko, 2018. Silk and vinyl, 36 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Ode to Yves, 2018. Dyed silk, 36 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Constellation CLT  is designed to connect visitors of The Mint Museum with the universe of talent in the local community.

In its second year, Constellation CLT is an exhibition series designed to connect visitors to The Mint Museum with artists in our community and to activate the public spaces of the museum. The installations rotate three times per year and can be seen in four places at Mint Museum Uptown: in the entrance; at the foot of the atrium escalator; and on the landings of the Mezzanine and 4th levels.

Constellation CLT is generously supported by The Arts & Science Council.

Previous Installations

Fall 2018

Winter 2019

Spring 2019

Fall 2019

de’Angelo Dia

Constellation CLT logo

de’Angelo Dia

22 September 2020–7 March 2021

About The Artist

While he has been called a faith leader, an educator, and an artist, de’Angelo Dia prefers the categories poet, theologian, and comic book scholar. All of these elements can be found in his drawings seen throughout Mint Museum Uptown.

Dia sets his figures in a state of development: their bodies are cocooned, but their heads have blossomed, each with unique features and a distinctive hairstyle. When Dia started the large scrolls, he was writing about people whose evolution–physical and spiritual– was arrested by systemic oppression. Similarly, the characters he draws explore different expressions and elements of African-American culture while not referring to a specific African tradition. The intention, Dia explains, is to recognize the hybrid nature of the culture those from the African diaspora must create in their new lands. Dia writes, “Slavery stripped people of their culture. These drawings celebrate the tenacity of Black and brown people to create a new culture.” This is a process, however. Dia wraps his figures in a chrysalis; in this condition, though they are preserved from harm, they also are not yet free. They are suspended in transition.


Follow de’Angelo Dia on Instagram: @dia1518 or check out his website: www.dia1518.com

Plaza level:

Ira, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Kwasi, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Yaa, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

 

 

2nd floor:

Betty, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Charlie, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Francis, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Epiphany, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Mezzanine:

Insomnia 4, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Fred, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

 

3th floor:

Abena, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Kwabena III, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

 

4th floor:

Akua, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Irvin, 2020, chalk on paper. Courtesy of the artist.

Constellation CLT  is designed to connect visitors of The Mint Museum with the universe of talent in the local community.

In its second year, Constellation CLT is an exhibition series designed to connect visitors to The Mint Museum with artists in our community and to activate the public spaces of the museum. The installations rotate three times per year and can be seen in four places at Mint Museum Uptown: in the entrance; at the foot of the atrium escalator; and on the landings of the Mezzanine and 4th levels.

Constellation CLT is generously supported by The Arts & Science Council.

Previous Installations

Classic Black: The Basalt Sculpture of Wedgwood and His Contemporaries

Classic Black: The Basalt Sculpture of Wedgwood and His Contemporaries

Feb 9, 2020 – Jan 3, 2021 | Mint Museum Randolph
Featuring more than 100 ceramic objects, with loans from notable public and private collections in the United States and England, this exhibition is the first to focus exclusively on the black basalt sculpture made by Josiah Wedgwood and other Staffordshire potters in late eighteenth-century England. Read More