Take 5 with Micah Cash: Artist talk on Coined in the South

Micah Cash is an American photographer who lives and works in Charlotte. Cash’s work uses the visual languages of landscape and architecture to “explore narratives of utilization, [separation], and ownership.” Cash’s very southern and peculiar Waffle House Vistas featured in Coined in the South exhibition focuses on the built environment as seen through the windows of Waffle House restaurants from across the southeastern United States. Micah has been featured in numerous private collections and a host of publications across North America. He received his MFA from the University of Connecticut and his Bachelor’s degree from the University of South Carolina.

This event is part of our new free event series, Live at the Mint. For eight weeks, the Mint is hosting a unique lineup of performances and activities for the local community to enjoy as part of our ongoing Free Wednesday Evening program.

 

December 11, 2019
Wednesday | 6- 6:15 PM
Mint Museum Uptown

 

 


This event is located at Mint Museum Uptown


Take 5 with Ken West: Artist talk on Coined in the South

Ken West is an American photographer and documentarian, born in the Historic Bordeaux Neighborhood of Nashville, Tennessee. Today Ken lives in Mableton, Georgia. Fascinated by storytelling, human perception, and the human experience, Ken was inspired to capture the moving images of “common things” and folk in both rural and city-life. His photos Father of Man and Black Boys Cry featured in Coined in the South exhibition encourages audiences to reevaluate how they view Black men and masculinity. By capturing people and things on camera and film “as they are and not how w[h]e wished they were…” West holds each of his subjects “in reverence, mindful appreciation and curiosity. West, has studied at the University of Paris, and holds graduate degrees from Ohio State University and New York University.

This event is part of our new free event series, Live at the Mint. For eight weeks, the Mint is hosting a unique lineup of performances and activities for the local community to enjoy as part of our ongoing Free Wednesday Evening program.

 

 

November 13, 2019
Wednesday | 6- 6:15
Mint Museum Uptown

 

 


This event is located at Mint Museum Uptown


Take 5 with Tom Schmidt: Artist talk on Coined in the South

Tom Schmidt is an American artist, designer, and educator who lives in Charlotte. Tom is an Associate Professor of Art & Art History and interdisciplinary 3D Studio and Digital Fabrication at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Tom was the Co-Founder of Recycled China from 2009 through 2013. Additionally, he taught ceramic design at the Alfred/CAFA (China Central Academy of Fine Art) Ceramic Design for Industry program in Beijing. His Notebook Series featured in Coined in the South uses paper and ink to capture “a sense of permanence” in the dwindling experience of touching pen to paper “in a post-digital age.” Schmidt received his Post-Baccalaureate Certificate at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and MFA at The New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University.

This event is part of our new free event series, Live at the Mint. For eight weeks, the Mint is hosting a unique lineup of performances and activities for the local community to enjoy as part of our ongoing Free Wednesday Evening program.

October 23, 2019
Wednesday | 6 – 6:15 PM
Mint Museum Uptown

 

 

 


This event is located at Mint Museum Uptown


 

Jasper Lee

Jasper Lee
birmingham, alabama

Instagram: @jasperlee.studio

 

 

 

 

 

 


Silver in the Churn
2019 Video (color, sound), full duration: 9:00

Courtesy of the artist

Silver in the Churn uses natural phenomena, bodily gestures and views of the Southern landscape to explore superstition, ritual and the sacred. Drawing from research into Southeastern superstitions, the abstract lyrical quality of this lore is woven into a hypnotic audio-visual song through repetition and juxtaposition.

Joyce Watkins King

Joyce Watkins King
raleigh, north carolina

Instagram: @jwkingartist

 

 

 

 

 

 


Joyce Watkins King. Familial Threads: Memory and Loss, 2017, mono-printed shirt collars on paper, thread. Courtesy of the artist.

Familial Threads: Memory and Loss
2017, Mono-printed shirt collars on paper, thread
Courtesy of the artist

I grew up as a child of the South and a descendant
of Eli Whitney in the small town of Oxford, NC with a mom who sewed my clothes as did her mother before her. Learning to sew while I was in middle school was my introduction to soft sculpture, though I did not realize it until I was studying at the NC State University College of Design many years later.

As a lifelong artist and designer, I have worked in many media during my career but returned to my roots in ber, fabric, and sewing in 2005 during an artist’s residency at Vermont Studio Center. For me, textiles are part of a universal language that cuts across all cultures, providing beauty, utility, and symbols for special occasions: births, initiations and celebrations. Fabric itself is a metaphor for how many separate strands (fragile thread or yarn) are fashioned together to make something strong, lasting and beautiful.

In opposition to the escalating trend of consuming and rapidly disposing of cheaply made clothing without consideration for the devastating e ects on ber growers, laborers, consumers, and especially the environment, in my most recent body of work I reuse garments, fabric, and thread whenever possible.

Chieko Murasugi

Chieko Murasugi
chapel hill, north carolina

Instagram: @cmurasugi

 

 

 

 

 


Chieko Murasugi. Roshambo (Rock, Paper, Scissors) #19, 2019, acrylic, collage (including nori), and black Flashe on Arches paper. Courtesy of the artist.
Instagram: @cmurasugi

Roshambo #19
2019, Acrylic, collage (including nori), and Flashe on Arches Paper
Courtesy of the artist

Each work in the Janken series consists of both painted and collage elements. The white collage pieces reference samurai armors, artifacts, and weapons preserved in museum collections. These pieces are cut out from older works on paper that contain toned paper, organic pigments, inks, and nori. The painted forms in Janken are inspired by Bauhaus and Op Art, with their at origami- inspired colors, ambiguous and shifting geometric forms. These illusive shapes allude to the shifting, transient, and often unreliable processes of memory and history.

Caroline Hatfield


Caroline Hatfield

carrolton, texas (formerly claiborne county, tennessee)

Instagram: @redfiveposts

 

 

 

 

 

 


Time is an Arrow and a Circle
2018, Salt, sand, cast aluminum, found metal
Courtesy of the artist

Time is an Arrow and a Circle sweeps across the gallery floor with an accumulation of sand and rock salt that points towards a circle or loop, but is not fully resolved. Arising from the applied ground of sparkling white sand are multiple aluminum castings, sculpted to resemble small-scale mountains or rocks, each of which are surrounded by a border of powdered aluminum.

This work is the most recent of many using sand, and I keep returning to it for its metaphorical value and inherent geological process. The metaphor of sand is one found throughout cultures and history. Like the idiom “sands of time” suggests, we associate the material closely with time and change. Further still, this relationship is echoed in the geological cycle of sand, as a material produced from the deterioration of rock that eventually lithifies, returning to rock. The life of sand is vast, long and far reaching. Speaking more compositionally, the mineral Silica is the most pervasive in our universe. As an artist, using this material provides a level of connectivity to the work, unifying my model or miniature landscape to the rest of the physical world.


A Far Shore
2019, Found object, resin bonded graphite and coal slag powdered pigments, water, acrylic sheet, two-way mirror, aluminum, flashing, lighting, on custom plinth
Courtesy of the artist

A Far Shore explores the fluidity and sublimity of space, time, and substance. The bucket is worn, showing signs of use and weathering such as rust and stains, yet sits atop a clean, white plinth. The contrast of object and presentation elevates the significance of the bucket and encourages the viewer to look more closely at its contents. Shimmering, angular formations ring the vessel’s interior. The forms are partly familiar – reminiscent of rocks or geodes. Yet, the material is strange and elemental. The deep black, carbon-like substance is somewhat volcanic or perhaps otherworldly. A body of water reaches just to the edge of the rocks, mimicking a shoreline. Peering into the water, the space appears to extend infinitely downward into a hazy, twinkling depth. The place within this seemingly ordinary container becomes foreign and abstract, evoking feelings of outer space, a distant planet, or a future world.

Nathaniel Lancaster

Nathaniel Lancaster
charlotte, north carolina

Instagram: @nathaniellancasterart


Oh Hay!
2018, Oil, acrylic, spray paint on canvas
Courtesy of the artist

This work started as a dumb joke between friends. “Hey!” “Hey is for horses.” The structure and manipulation of language and how we interpret it is interesting to me and particularly fun to play with.

Stephanie Sutton

Stephanie Sutton
buford, georgia

 

 

 

 

 


Heavy Set
2016-17, Video (color, sound)
full duration: 08:46
Courtesy of the artist

The performances in Heavy Set can be seen playing, at times simultaneously, in a sequence that evokes a matrix of sensations that contradict one another, complicating relentless virtues of discipline as they relate to the body. In this installation, the fat body is utilized for its hypervisual mark of body subjectivity and can be seen as a producer, as an observed object, as a political choice, as an abundant tree, as a receptacle for pleasure. The shifting perspectives and unresolved tensions of corporeality demonstrated in Heavy Set are what it means to look at, perform, or be any body.