Stephanie Sutton

Stephanie Sutton
buford, georgia

 

 

 

 

 


Heavy Set
2016-17, Video (color, sound)
full duration: 08:46
Courtesy of the artist

The performances in Heavy Set can be seen playing, at times simultaneously, in a sequence that evokes a matrix of sensations that contradict one another, complicating relentless virtues of discipline as they relate to the body. In this installation, the fat body is utilized for its hypervisual mark of body subjectivity and can be seen as a producer, as an observed object, as a political choice, as an abundant tree, as a receptacle for pleasure. The shifting perspectives and unresolved tensions of corporeality demonstrated in Heavy Set are what it means to look at, perform, or be any body.

Kevin Cole

Kevin Cole
fairburn, georgia

Website: artistkcole.com

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jacob’s Ladder: Do Lord Remember Me—for Mrs. Catlett
2017, Mixed media with wood
Courtesy of the artist

My Jacob’s Ladder series is inspired by that epiphanous moment when we all at some point recognize that the end of life may be closer than the beginning. In that moment, most men and women stop to contemplate whether the acts/the art that define who we are today will be remembered tomorrow once we are no longer here. Will the actions that have been part of a purely existential life be pleasing to Him whom we believe in (if we are believers)? Jacob’s Ladder: Do Lord Remember Me—for Mrs. Catlett, a tribute to Elizabeth Catlett, speaks to the ever-present reminders that we are defined by our own actions, and will be judged accordingly.

Spirit-like, the soaring piece is suspended in mid-air. Two nine-foot long wooden strips representing both a tie and a scarf are connected by five rung-like rods, rising to join with a curvilinear mass that could be interpreted as a cloud, head, or even an ark. Three rods that could be handles protrude horizontally from the mass at the top. Muted with drips of reddish-brown reminiscent of dried blood and green streaks seemingly representing life itself, the predominantly gold and yellow colors create a surreal glow.

Travis Donovan

Travis Donovan
banner elk, north carolina

Instagram: @travisualize

 

 

 

 

 


Two Man Crosscut Saw (Rose)
2019, Etched steel
Courtesy of the artist

This work is part of a series investigating masculine stereotypes and expectations in the South where I grew up, juxtaposing typically masculine imagery and practices with images and practices that are typically viewed as feminine. The crosscut saw is a part of a series of tools I collected at various ages growing up and is actually my great grandfather’s. These objects were symbols of masculine status. The patterns on the outside are directly from my grandmother’s wallpaper patterns. The juxtaposition of the materials and imagery reference the simultaneous expectations of masculine aggressiveness and delicate quality of the patterns that I enjoyed drawing as a young man.

Katie St. Clair

Katie St. Clair
davidson, north carolina

Website: katiestclair.art

 

This year’s Young Affiliates of the Mint juried show features three prizes. Katie St. Clair of Davidson, NC. won the $5,000 Young Affiliates of the Mint Choice Award.

We encourage the public to visit the exhibition and vote for the $1,000 people’s choice award. Voting will be open through December 31.

 

 

 

 


Wayside
2019, Natural debris, trash, pigment and ice on canvas
Courtesy of the artist
My time-based installations use material I have collected from the roadside, drainage ditches, land between buildings, and other marginal places in the local landscape. I depend on experiences in these places to fuel me in all their concrete specificity: earth, water, stones, rot, worms, mushrooms, new growth, and their human counterpart: cigarette butts, broken glass, cracked cement.

 

The installation is a set of spheres made of locally collected refuse and natural pigment that is held together by ice. The full frozen spheres are hung above a canvas and melt over time. As the spheres melt jagged objects come to the surface, some balance and others fall onto the wet canvas. Eventually the water and pigment settle into large pools on the canvas that evaporate over time, leaving an inky crust of marks that result in a painting.

 

The installation exposes all the different stages of transformation in the painting process that viewers don’t normally see in a gallery. As opposed to my painting practice, the melting of the spheres is a natural act of painting without an artist’s hand. There is immediacy to these built structures that have an expiration. A moment in time that holds those leaves, trash and that water before they move. There is a smell in the gallery of spring, of wet pavement and roadside material that lingers in the air.

Stephanie J. Woods

Stephanie J Woods
charlotte, north carolina

Instagram: @Stephaniej.woods

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lavender Notes
2019, Burlap dyed with sweet tea, satin bonnets, upholstered satin prints, vinyl, and hand-made
custom frames
Courtesy of the artist

Lavender Notes features portraits of a figure masked by satin bonnets. Satin bonnets are commonly worn at night to protect natural hair, but here, the purpose is to shield the figure. To create Lavender Notes, hand-made bonnets were embellished with written reflections generated from a community-engaged project titled “Relax. Relate. Release,” and shipped to Black Americans. Those who received the bonnets were asked to write a reflection that was, in turn, shared on another bonnet and shipped to someone else.

Each bonnet displays different reflections such as: “Fly, stand, overcome,” and “I am beautifully bold.” The words presented are inspirational, yet they feel like a burden or an unrealistic expectation. Scrambled on the frames are also words; the illegibility of the words raises questions about disclosure. How much of ourselves should remain guarded? And how much released?

Deighton Abrams

Deighton Abrams
seneca, south carolina

Instagram: @deightoncceramics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


WNDRR ABVE THE C OF FOG
2019, Single fired stoneware, glaze, wood,
insulation foam, paint
Courtesy of the artist

Climate change’s existential threat is one that has become so pronounced that every aspect of our daily consumption can be analyzed and traced to larger destructive forces. My work explores the empathic connections between humans, the creative process, and the physical landscape, investigating the phenomenon of psychological distress associated with consumption and climate change.

This work references the 1818 Caspar David Friedrich Romantic era painting of (approximately) the same name. The original work features a lone human introspectively looking out over an expanse of jagged peaks and mist and we assume they will move along shortly after, back to the comforts of civilization. This sculpture, however, features a lone iteration of an otherwise inanimate mountain form perched atop a base whose legs allude to a forward momentum: a wandering peak. This gives agency and anthropomorphizes the mountain form, perhaps giving us pause when we think of these otherwise massive forms as stoic and uninterruptable; the very makeup of the ceramic work the result of rocks crushed, reformed, and fired to a new shape, moved far from its original source.

Harrison Walker

Harrison Walker 
athens, georgia

Instagram: @hdwalker86

 

Thinking about ideas of exploration, communication, and the unknown, these collages were made using both found and self-created photographs and drawing.

 

 

 


Points of Origin
2018-19, Collage
Courtesy of the artist

Redstone
2018-19, Collage
Courtesy of the artist

Transit of Venus
2018-19, Collage
Courtesy of the artist

Ivana Milojevic Beck

Ivana Milojevic Beck 
raleigh, north carolina

Instagram: @ivanambeck

 

 

 

 

 

 


Untitled VI
2016, Brick, wax, wire
Courtesy of the artist
My work orbits around my life adaptation to a new habitat. My interest in using brick and wax as a medium has been rooted in my daily contemplation of my Serbian home. I perceive brick as the foundational material for home building as well as a metaphor for the people who were responsible for my own groundwork.

Susan Brenner

Susan Brenner
charlotte, north carolina

Instagram: @Susan_brenner

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The State of Things 1819
2018, Mixed media on paper in 2 panels
Courtesy of the artist and Elder Gallery of Contemporary Art

The State of Things is an ongoing series of mixed media works on paper that represent my uneasiness in response to the rapid change, constantly unfolding tragedies, and seeming chaos of the world. In The State of Things I endeavor to find a delicate balance between chaos and order, between anxiety and optimism, between beauty and turmoil. I depict situations that are in flux yet held in tension.

I begin by photographing heaps of scrap metal reflective of our consumerist excesses, of our constant tearing down to rebuild our surroundings. I reorient the images to change their center of gravity, then digitally turn them into line drawings, which I print and then paint over. My intent is to create images that appear unstable, where there is a sense of excess, of tangled objects and forms in flux. Something might topple over or collapse; there is potential danger. Yet, I cannot help but inject optimism into the work. For me, the very act of making art is an act of optimism. In a way, my inclination to create order and beauty constitutes an attempt to heal the problems I observe.

Micah Cash

Micah Cash
charlotte, north carolina

Instagram: @MicahCash 

 

My work investigates how land use and social history influence cultural geography. Themes of ownership, demarcation, and utilization are explored through the languages of landscape and architecture. We can see how we treat and value each other, and how we are valued by those in positions of power, by merely looking out the window. My projects aim to ask hard questions about who we are as a society and push back against the economic and governmental structures that segregate us by race and class.

Waffle House Vistas focuses on the built environment as seen through the windows of Waffle House restaurants from across the southeastern United States. The collected images contemplate the surrounding architecture of habitat and commerce through the lens of a southern cultural icon. These photographs ask viewers to look up from their hash browns and acknowledge the institutions and structures that create real, yet rarely acknowledged boundaries that feel impossible to break through for much of this country. The images look out from booths and chairs, placing the viewer as a witness to the intertwined narratives of poverty, transience, economics, and politics.

 

 


Store #604: West Memphis, Arkansas
2018, Archival pigment print
Courtesy of the artist

 

 

 

 


Store #1449: Calvert City, Kentucky
2018, Archival pigment print
Courtesy of the artist

 

 

 

 


Store #1912: Mobile, Alabama
2018, Archival pigment print
Courtesy of the artist