Rachel Meginnes

Rachel Meginnes 
bakersville, north carolina

Instagram: @Rachelmeginnes

 

 

 

 

 

 


Plain Sight
2019, Deconstructed quilt, hand stitching, image transfer, acrylic, and spray paint
Courtesy of Tracey Morgan Gallery

My work begins with the deconstruction of old quilts. Referred to as cutter quilts, these hand-me-down textiles have absorbed decades of stains, folds, and tears over time. After carefully removing the quilting, stitch by stitch, I peel back the top and bottom layers to reveal a network of cotton riddled with holes inside. Immersed in the net-like nature of the batting, I am intent on showing how a once stable material has eroded over the years through the very acts of use and storage that were meant to protect it. My process mimics this natural decay and explores my own human desire to create and maintain a place of safety.

Beverly Smith

Beverly Smith 
charlotte, north carolina

Instagram: @quiltbev

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Not Just Child’s Play
2019, Fabric, graphite, acrylic paint, and embroidery
Courtesy of the artist

Not Just Child’s Play is one of three works that is part of a series of mixed-media quilts that reflect the role and lasting impact of playing with dolls. Not Just Child’s Play has a deeper meaning focusing on the psychological impact dolls have on shaping one’s character. Applying traditional quilt patterns, I used vintage patchwork designs. The sunflower bright yellow colors are vibrant and express emotions associated with the energy and happiness of a child. The child is holding a doll that is of Asian descent with one button eye symbolizing the importance of diversity and acceptance.

My quilt surface is layered with machine stitching, hand embroidery, and acrylic paint. I incorporated hand embroidered sunflower embellishments to give the quilt top added dimension. My graphite figures are drawn on unprimed canvas using a range of pencil values. I utilized an appliqué process using freezer paper to create pattern designs.

 


Shaping My Own Identity
2018, Fabric, graphite, transfers, acrylic paint, embroidery, and amulets
Courtesy of the artist
It was an enchanting time whenever I played with my dolls. My most tattered dolls were beautiful to me. They represented courage, strength, and independence.
Shaping My Identity is one of three works that is part of a series of mixed-media quilts that reflect the role and lasting impact of playing with dolls. This series reflects my childhood memories. The age of adolescence in the quilt represents transitioning from creative play with baby dolls to paper dolls. The connected paper dolls symbolize the interconnectedness with my community and the world.
My quilt surface is layered with machine stitching, hand embroidery, paint, and transferred images. I incorporated buttons, and a charm amulet belt embellishment to give the quilt top added dimension. My graphite figures are drawn on unprimed canvas using a range of pencil values. I utilized an applique process using freezer paper to create pattern designs.

MJ Sharp

MJ Sharp
durham, north carolina

Twitter: @MJgrabsCamera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Terror Triptych (Detail)
2013/2019, Gelatin silver prints
Courtesy of the artist

I discovered these sticky pad traps in a family basement and, in addition to being horrified by them, was intrigued to see that each individual pad seemed to have an animal “theme”— the flour moths, whose evidence of long suffering was the powder from their wings on the adhesive as they tried to get away; the disdained camel crickets, whose suffering is no less real because so many of us have no love for them (the number of poops under each one shows the passage of time); and finally the macro creature that we identify with most closely, the lizard, who, a viewer suggested, was probably drawn to the pad by the struggling insects that it hoped to make its meal. Evidence of its struggle is apparent in the way all four legs are on one side of its body, and its skin texture is imprinted into the gelatin around it.

Hence, the Terror Triptych—so beautiful from afar, resembling constellations and star charts—becomes a scene of carnage and recorded suffering as you get close. And truthfully, that is why I used black and white sheet film that is the same size as the pads. I knew I wanted to make the prints very, very large and with excruciating clarity. I wanted us to have to see in detail the suffering we caused these overlooked creatures.

Kenn Kotara

Kenn Kotara
asheville, north carolina

Website: kotarastudio.com
Instagram: @kennkotara

 

 

 

 

 

 


Losing Ground
2016–2019, Mixed media on paper on canvas and wood
Courtesy of the artist

Using geometric overlays, map diagrams and Braille, Losing Ground depicts an interpretation of Louisiana’s loss of coastal land due to river levee construction, the oil & gas industry, and impactful weather events. Louisiana land loss roughly equates into losing a football field every hour. A work on paper mounted to canvas, various materials from pencil, pencil color, marker to oil pastel and acrylic convey a process of addition and subtraction, or gains and losses. The invisible hand in economics generally refers to unintended social benefits, but also has the opposite effect, as depicted in Losing Ground.

 


Overtopping
2019, Mixed media on paper on canvas and wood
Courtesy of the artist

Overtopping is commonly used in reference to levee failures or breaches but is also defined as superiority of one person over another. Building on a one-point perspective, Overtopping illustrates a bleak landscape of opposing of forces in nature and human nature due to a broken barrier. The geometric shape shifting transformed into memory-based configurations is a process of identifying particular data, culminating in an epic narrative.

Jackson Martin

Jackson Martin
asheville, north carolina

Website: JacksonMartin.com

 

 

 

 

 

 


40-Hour Workweek
2017, Vinyl
Courtesy of the artist

This piece is composed of 300 layers of hand-cut vinyl mesh fabric and reflects the dimensions of a traditional American cinderblock. It required 40 hours to create and there is no thread or glue, using only gravity as a fastener.

 


Sleeps 3
2017, Nylon fabric, Fiberglass poles, aluminum frame, foam, thread, hardware
Courtesy of the artist

This piece is created from an old external-frame camping backpack and an old family 3-person tent. The final form represents a home that can be worn and carried anywhere.

Riley Hammond

Riley Hammond
richmond, virginia

Website: riley-hammond-weebly.com

 

 

 

 

 

 


86 and Below
2019, Acrylic, sand and woodburning on wood panel
Courtesy of the artist

The women of my family have always been and will always be entranced by alligators. Growing up, there was not a vacation to Florida where we didn’t pull over and stop at an alligator farm or swamp—and in the top left corner is an homage to one of the many vintage postcards we have in our collection from these places. When my mother was young, her father would pull into the driveway once or twice a year, with a new car (1974 Chevelle, pictured on the bottom right) to take them on a literal guilt trip. However cold blooded, alligators are intrinsically maternal. Unlike many other reptiles, they take great care in nesting and protecting their young. The temperature of the nest will also determine the sex of the offspring. 86 degrees (variably) and below will result in female baby alligators.
Today, I think it’s funny that I grew up in a house full of women that refused to ever allow us to turn the heat up in the winter in order to save on electricity. I grew up in the cold nest! And on my father’s side, a similar nesting was tradition. My paternal grandmother’s house sat on a hill above a small swamp (where we lost the occasional toy poodle to an alligator) in Bamberg, SC—and she lived there, in another 1970s brick rancher, cared for by her daughters for decades.


93 and Above
2019, Acrylic and sand on wood panel
Courtesy of the artist

This companion piece to 86 and Below speaks again to the unbalanced male presence in the home. In a nest, if the eggs are 93 degrees and above, they will be male. This looping design is taken from a van my grandfather bought (without my grandmother’s knowledge) and showed up with to take the kids on another vacation. For me, a lot of the moments spent with my own father were also surrounding transportation, in the car for the every-other-weekend visit or on long trips to South Carolina. In each oval are representations of 9167 Aaroe Drive, a home base. The swamp memento, fabric from our couch, wallpaper in the game room, and forsythia bushes.

Denise Stewart-Sanabria

Denise Stewart-Sanabria
knoxville, tennessee

Instagram: @denisestweartsanabria_

 

 

 

 

 

 


People # 49, 50, 51
2017, Charcoal and pastel pencil on plywood
Courtesy of the artist

These works are part of a series concentrating on the large-scale representation of contemporary people. Humans give off subtle clues as to the culture and social groupings they inhabit. Most of my reference material comes from observing people at art receptions. The virtual reality concept I focus on is intensified when they are returned, as drawings, to the environment they were found in.

 

 

Thomas Campbell

Thomas Campbell
penland, north carolina

Instagram: @thomas_campbell

 

 

 

 

 

 


Continuum
2019, Painted and blackened steel
Private collection

My artistic practice evolved from the depths of the industrial world following a seven-year stint as a steelworker for my family’s 134-year-old steel fabrication business. I aim to honor this familial tradition in my work, drawing on the technical skills, the industrial aesthetic, and the processes that have driven functional steel fabrication for decades.

Erin Castellan

Erin Castellan
penrose, north carolina

Instagram: @erinecastellan_studio

 

 

 

 

 

 


Keep One Foot in the Black
2018, Thread, beads, acrylic paint, found fabric, felt
Courtesy of the artist

Slick, shiny, manufactured beads and bright stitches sit against a curious monochrome texture of pierced and painted wool. The physicality of the materials stands in direct contrast to the colorful illusions and spatial tricks they create. The title comes from a conversation I had with my husband who is a wildland firefighter. In his world, if you ‘keep one foot in the black’ (the land that has already burned), you have an escape. It is a means of survival. I imagined a person straddling a thin line, one foot in black (life/tangibility), and one foot in color (death/intangibility). Colors, materials, and forms are visually woven together in a precarious balance.

 


Fight Fire with Fire
2017, Thread, beads, acrylic paint, found fabric, felt
Courtesy of the artist

Puffy, blueish-green fabric depicts water. Felt, beads, and embroidery in pinks and reds depict fire. There is a portal of sorts through which a deeper space can be seen, but there is no set foreground or background. Spatial relationships continually shift back and forth as a result of the work’s materiality. This piece is heavily embellished with beads and stitching. I believe the measurable time I put into a piece influences not only the length, but also the quality of a viewer’s perceptual involvement. For example, I believe viewers become entangled in visually picking apart the minute details of embroidered stitches, but their captivation may also be driven by a desire for the intimacy and human interaction that is embodied in each stitch.

Erin Canady

Erin Canady
durham, north carolina

Instagram: @e_canady

 

 

 


10 Years Pt. 2
2018, Graphite on paper
Courtesy of the artist

Through the lens of drawing, my work centers around themes of temporality, meditation, ritual, and futility. I am inspired by my time spent in Iceland, my study of Daoism, my experiences with trauma and loss, and my continual desire to understand the world around me. Materials and process are chosen carefully, as they often parallel the content within my work. Water is used as a primary medium for its connection to certain Daoist philosophies and to our own human bodies. Oftentimes I act as a catalyst for my drawings—combining materials together and initiating a process that falls out of my control as time passes.


 

(H)our 3
2018,Graphite on paper
Courtesy of the artist

Through the lens of drawing, my work centers around themes of temporality, meditation, ritual, and futility. I am inspired by my time spent in Iceland, my study of Daoism, my experiences with trauma and loss, and my continual desire to understand the world around me. Materials and process are chosen carefully, as they often parallel the content within my work. Water is used as a primary medium for its connection to certain Daoist philosophies and to our own human bodies. Oftentimes I act as a catalyst for my drawings—combining materials together and initiating a process that falls out of my control as time passes.