Make your own marble prints with shaving cream

Make your own marble prints with shaving cream

This fun (and messy) project for all ages is inspired by the paintings of Harlem Renaissance painter, Beauford Delaney. Your final creation can be displayed as a print, folded into a card, or used as the background for a collage or drawing. Share what you make by tagging us on Instagram @themintmuseum.

 

Inspired by Beauford Delaney (American, 1901–79). Untitled, 1959, oil on canvas. Museum Purchase: The Katherine and Thomas Belk Acquisition Fund. 2017.7

SUPPLIES

  • Baking sheet or tray (large enough to fit your paper and deep enough to hold shaving cream)
  • White shaving cream
  • Paint or food coloring
  • Stick or toothpick (end of paintbrush works too)
  • Plastic ruler or other flat edge that can get wet
  • Paper
  • Paper towels or cleaning cloth
  • Open space to lay out your prints

STEPS

1. Cover bottom of sheet pan with shaving cream.

2. Drizzle paint or food coloring on top of shaving cream and use a stick to swirl colors together. Be careful not to over mix or colors will become muddy.

3. Press paper gently into shaving cream making sure to get the whole sheet to make contact.

4. Lift from one corner and remove the paper (shaving cream will stick to it). Lay it dry side down on paper towels or a surface that can be washed.

5. Starting at one end, scrape off shaving cream with ruler or flat edge.

6. Lightly blot your paper with a clean paper towel or rag and let dry. You can use the same shaving cream a second time to make a lighter version of the first. Just repeat steps 3-6.

The Mint Museum From Home is Sponsored by Chase.

12 Books Mint Staffers Are Reading During These Crazy COVID-19 Times

12 Books Mint Staffers Are Reading During These Crazy COVID-19 Times

We all need some inspiration for how to make the most of the time while home. From artful reads to novels and nonfiction, here’s what the Mint staff is reading. And though we know a run to the library is out, check out Audible, Hoopla, and Overdrive for digital versions.  

ARTFUL READS 

Of Cats and Men: Profiles of History’s Great Cat-Loving Artists, Writers, Thinkers, and Statesmen by Sam Kalda 

My niece sent me this book, assuming I would enjoy it because No. 1, I’m a man, and No. 2, I have six cats. She was right! This small, but completely delightful book profiles 30 famous and talented men — Mark Twain, Romare Bearden, Freddie Mercury, and Sir Isaac Newton, to name a few — and their love for their cats. Sam Kalda’s breezy, anecdote-laden write-ups, and wonderful color illustrations make this the purr-fect publication to pick up this reader’s mood every time he opens it. 

—Brian Gallagher, Curator of Decorative Arts 

Vincent Van Gogh: Letters from Provence by Martin Bailey 

An important moment in the history of this region of France. I always think it’s very important to hear the firsthand accounts from historical figures whenever possible. You get to know them better and often gain insights into their daily lives that never make it into biographies. 

—Todd A Herman, PhD, President and CEO  

Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art by Mary Gabriel 

I first began this book because of my love and curiosity for the Abstract Expressionist and the movement that changed the art world with swirls of color, often rooted in emotion rather than subject matter. But more specifically, I dove head first in this book because it features five of the women that passionately threw themselves into the middle of this movement. These artists, against all odds, used art to understand the chaos that surrounded them during a time when the world was changing drastically. When I first started reading it, we were not yet in the midst of a pandemic, but now as I read, it gives me hope that on the other side of our current situation there will be a lot of beautiful creativity… Who knows, maybe even a new art movement. 

HannaH Crowell, Exhibition Designer 

NOVELS 

The Radium Girls by Kate Moore 

This book is about girls who applied radium to wash their faces before it was known how dangerous it was. Great lesson in history.  

—Lyndee Champion Ivey, Executive Assistant 

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt 

I am reading The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. So far the book is about a young boy who lost his mother in a tragic accident at the Met. Theo, the young boy, survives and takes a small painting out of the museum when he escapes. The book is about love and loss, and the different people that come into Theo’s life. This is a book I haven’t been able to put down. 

—Martha Snell, Grants Manager 

The Girl with the Louding Voice: A Novel by Abi Daré 

I just started Abi Daré’s The Girl with the Louding Voice, one of my Book of the Month Club picks. (NOTE: BOTM is perfect for self-quarantined book lovers.) It’s about a 14-year-old Nigerian girl who is first sold into marriage, then into servanthood, but remains determined to find her voice — and her future.  

—Caroline Portillo, Director of Marketing 

NONFICTION 

The One Thing by Gary Keller with Jay Papasan 

The One Thing takes the position that multitasking is ineffective and that we should concentrate  on one goal at a time. The core idea is to determine what single achievement is most important in getting you toward your goals. I began reading this about 10 days ago in response to my ever-growing, unmanageable to-do list. As all of our lives go through rapid change, I’m grateful to have the reminder to slow my brain down and focus on the most important things.  

—Katherine Steiner, Chief Registrar 

I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai 

I started reading I Am Malala last week. It was a gift from my boss, who knows how much I love nonfiction stories, especially about women. Here’s a little summary: “When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. She was shot in the head while riding the bus home from school. 

—Kurma Murrain, Community Programs Coordinator 

Becoming by Michele Obama 

This is the April discussion book for my book club. I have been a member of The No Name Book Club for over 20 years. While wine is an important part of our meetings, this is a serious group of readers. If one is present, it’s understood that you read the book! I consequently make it to about half of the meetings per year.  

—Amy Grigg, Manager and Buyer for Retail Operations 

The Complete Book of Garlic by Ted Jordan Meredith 

I am currently re-reading The Complete Book of Garlic by Ted Jordan Meredith because: 

  • Garlic is one of the most fascinating crops. What else do you plant in November? 
  • The photographs alone are worth taking the time to crack this book open. 
  •  It is calming to be gardening and reading about gardening during these stressful times. 

—Eric Speer, Associate Registrar 

FOR THE KIDS 

Poe Won’t Go by Kelly DiPucchio 

Poe is a friendly elephant, but when he decides to just stop moving in the middle of the town, everyone is in an uproar about how to get him moving along. After lots of silly attempts by well-meaning grown-ups, one kind girl takes the time to talk with Poe and discovers the very reason he won’t goA story of kindness and friendship, and favorite of my 4-year-old. 

—Michele Huggins, Media Relations and Communications Project Manager 

Little Blue Truck Leads the Way by Alice Schertle 

A recommendation from my 21-month-old son, Jacob. It’s a tale about a truck who heads to the big city and encounters lots of traffic and me-first personalities. Chaos ensues, and our protagonist has to use his country sensibilities to effect change. Jacob’s passion for “beep beep” is indefatigable. Mine? Well … 

—Caroline Portillo, Director of Marketing